It’s not INSULIN that makes you fat

What I Discovered that Three Professional Nutrition Coaches Didn’t Know

 

Video highlights

  • 3:07     Start
  • 5:22     The most important question to ask your self before you start a diet
  • 5:45     A simple understanding of the role of insulin
  • 7:18     What is insulin resistance?
  • 8:12     Excess glucose turns to fat
  • 8:47     How do you management insulin and fat burning
  • 9:08     Why “Eat less. Move more.” diets fail 93% of the time
  • 10:08    Why those on the Biggest Loser failed
  • 10:40    Your two storage compartments of calories
  • 12:15    Why the starvation and kill your self in the gym diets slow down your metabolism
  • 14:10    Why athletes bonk in races
  • 22:23    The most predictable diet

The ONE Attitude to be the BEST Mom (or dad) Ever!

COMMUNICATION FROM A FLYING SAUCER

martianThe trouble with earthlings is their early adulthood. As long as they are young, they are lovable, open-hearted, tolerant, eager to learn and to collaborate. They can even be induced to play with one another. Most adults, however, are mortal enemies. The only educational problem earth has is how to keep them young. For life, evolution, progress, and adaptation to new situations, they are useful only as long as they keep their youthful qualities. But the funny thing is that in all the educational institutions I visited the object was to hasten maturity instead of delaying it. Surely your history can teach you that only the races with the longest childhood were able to remain in the cultural mainstream. The ideal should be to prolong childhood up to sixty years.

Why your BRAIN quits on Low-calorie Diets

IMG_9383From Jeff Volek PhD and Dr Stephen Phinney MD’s book, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living, we read,

“The brain is the spoiled child of the organ family. It can burn glucose or ketones (or a combination of the two) and it can’t burn fat. This is interesting because the brain itself contains a lot of fatty acids in all its membranes and myelin (although little or none as triglycerides), and the many types of brain cells all contain mitochondria that should be capable of oxidizing fatty acids. Another surprise about the brain is how much energy it consumes each day (600 kcal) despite weighing just 3 pounds. This is more than 10-times the average energy use per pound of the rest of the body, which explains why the brain has such a large blood supply (to provide fuel and oxygen and also to keep it cool).

The other important fact about the brain’s fuel supply is that it contains no reserve supply of glycogen, and because it can’t burn fat, it is absolutely dependent upon a minute-by-minute blood supply containing both fuel and oxygen to meet its needs. This