Beyond weight loss: a review of the therapeutic uses of very-low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diets

Most people, including me, began a ketogenic (low-carb, high-fat) diet to manage my weight. However, there are many other benefits. According to Volek, et al (See peer review evidence) there are other benefits of a ketogenic diet including;

STRONG EVIDENCE TO SUPPORT

  1. Weight loss
  2. Cardiovascular disease
  3. Type 2 diabetes
  4. Epilepsy

EMERGING EVIDENCE TO SUPPORT

  1. Acne
  2. Cancer
  3. Polycystic ovary syndrome
  4. Alzheimer’s disease
  5. Parkinson’s disease
  6. Brain trauma
  7. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

According to the published paper,

“Very-low-carbohydrate diets or ketogenic diets have been in use since the 1920s as a therapy for epilepsy and can, in some cases, completely remove the need for medication. From the 1960s onwards they have become widely known as one of the most common methods for obesity treatment. Recent work over the last decade or so has provided

Your Brain on Ketones; How a high-fat diet can make your brain work better

by

Emily Deans M.D.

The modern prescription of high carbohydrate, low fat diets and eating snacks between meals has coincided with an increase in obesity, diabetes, and and increase in the incidence of many mental health disorders, including depression, anxiety, and eating disorders. In addition, many of these disorders are striking the population at younger ages. While most people would agree that diet has a lot to do with the development of obesity and diabetes, many would disagree that what we eat has much to do with our mental health and outlook. I believe that what we eat has a lot to do with the health of our brains, though of course mental illness (like physical illness) has multifactorial causes, and by no means should we diminish the importance of addressing all the causes in each individual. But let’s examine the opposite of the modern high carbohydrate, low fat, constant snacking lifestyle and how that might affect the brain.

The opposite of a low fat, snacking lifestyle would be the lifestyle our ancestors lived for tens of thousands of generations, the lifestyle for which our brains are primarily evolved. It seems reasonable that we would…..

Go to the article on the Psychology Today blog

What I learned from the Ironman that changed my life

The Ironman triathlon consists of a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bike ride ending with a 26.2-mile marathon run. What went on from the very instant I decided to attempt it to finally finishing the race taught me more than I could have ever learned from a college degree of study.

“It was like anything that has ever been worthwhile in my life; it was hard, painful and memorable.” Michael Lantz

It was like anything that has ever been worthwhile in my life; it was hard, painful and memorable. I learned a great deal about the conflict of my body hurting and wanting to stop and my mind playing tricks on me, tempting me to quit.

If I had to sum up the top three things I learned about myself it would include these.

Commitment

I learned that my level of commitment is equal to the importance I place on my goals and dreams. When I decided to do my first Ironman on April 15, 2007, I was all in. I was not going to let anything get in the way of crossing that finish line. 

Your Brain on Exercise!

THE POWERFUL EFFECTS OF EXERCISE ON THE BRAIN

From ADDICTIONS to MENTAL ILLNESS, EXERCISE is increasingly recommended as part of a TREATMENT PLAN

By Pete Williams

(from USA Triathlon Fall 2017 Magazine)

The multisport lifestyle is full of success stories of people who overcame addictions and depression by adopting a busy training schedule of swimming, biking and running.

After all, it’s difficult to train for a triathlon with addictions getting in the way. Throw in the endorphin rush of training and the joy of competition that never grows old, and it’s not surprising that a number of athletes have beaten addiction, depression and even ADHD by replacing a bad habit with a healthy one such as triathlon training.

John Ratey, a clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, remembers when such positive body-mind connections were not widely recognized. During his residency in Boston at the height of the first running boom in the 1970s, Ratey worked with a marathon runner who had grown depressed when he stopped running and

HIIT; All the Pain, but is there more to gain?

HIGH- INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING

By Christian C. Evans

From Fall 2017 of USA Triathlon Magazine

ALL THE PAIN, BUT IS THERE MORE GAIN?

HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING (HIIT) is a technique that has been used extensively to train athletes as well as for improving fitness and outcomes for people with medical conditions ranging from diabetes to heart disease. HIIT typically involves six to 10 short duration (10-60 seconds), super-high-intensity efforts (all-out or near 100 percent heart rate or VO2 Max) with a longer rest bout in between. Overall, HIIT is considered safe and effective, but is it better compared to moderate-intensity training for improving fitness and triathlon race performance?

As triathletes and consumers of triathlon products and media, we rely mainly on the word of manufacturers, athletes, and coaches to make decisions about the intensity and frequency of training. If there were no scientific literature available, then those sources would be appropriate. But over the past 30-40 years, there has been a lot of research on moderate intensity aerobic training and HIIT. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief overview of the scientific literature evaluating HIIT and advice about its use.

Fortunately, several systematic reviews (studies that objectively evaluate many individual studies and draw a conclusion on the overall effectiveness of a technique) have already been performed that have examined HIIT. Five recent reviews