You can’t change until you start here

I met with a great long time friend last night. He’s a serious student of fitness. He’s 68 years old and looks 40 with 6% body fat. During his day he was a great marathon runner who has a Boston Marathon finish.

Then, unfortunately, developed a condition and had to have a knee replaced. That ended his running career.

Now he’s changed his focus to building muscle. He’s a self described gym rat.

He declared to me that he’s always wanted those “six pack” abs but that goal has been elusive. I asked him why he can’t do it.

He said he needs to give up a few of his bad nutrition habits he’s had for years.

He’s hooked on ice cream and sugar.

I asked him why he can’t quit.

He said, “I’ve tried. I’m hooked on it. If I could eliminate that from my diet, I’d lose the weight and my abs would show.”

Then I introduced him to the 12-Step Addiction Recovery Program that I run for our church. He looked at me kinda strange and shocked. But he listened. He never considered that the reason he can’t give up ice cream and sugar is that he is addicted to them.

I told him Step One is where you start.

The first step is Honesty. It reads, “Step 1: Admit that you, of yourself, are powerless to overcome your addiction and that your life has become unmanageable.”

 

Change always starts with with being honest. Most people who can’t change have excuses why. Excuses are deflections from some emotion inside that they do not want others to see.

Looking in that mirror of life and seeing the true reflection of yourself and affirming with complete honesty that you can’t change, you don’t know how and need help, is the first step to change.

Being honest is change and it’s the first step forward.

 

Insulin; it affects everyone

A recent Facebook live presentation about insulin resistance .

Highlights:

  • Predicting the results of a diet before you even start
  • Role insulin plays
  • What is insulin resistance
  • Lower insulin with low carb diets and intermittent fasting

Diet Results Chart

The lower the amount of carbohydrates in a diet the more predictable your diet will be.

Predicable graph

The Role of Insulin in Fat Storage or Fat Burning

insulin-fat-burning

What happens when you eat?

Seems like an easy answer. “I put food in my mouth and don’t think about it.” Let’s explore the science after you “don’t think about it” anymore.

Most of the time when you eat you ingest more food energy than you can immediately use. The excess energy needs to be stored for later use. The key to “storage for later use” or “immediate use” is insulin (and you thought insulin was something diabetics worried about).

Insulin is released into the blood stream when you eat carbohydrates and protein and to a very small amount when you eat fat. Insulin is a pathway key that does one of two things and in this order, 1) it turns on the storage of the excess as fat and 2) it keeps the cell’s glucose (the sugar that is made primarily from carbohydrates) receptors open so the 

Free touches

Have you ever had someone hold the door open for you or let you into traffic? Certainly you’ve allowed someone in line before you at a checkout stand because they only had a few items. How about touching someone on the shoulder as you just expressed a simple, “Thank you?!”

The best is a kind smile while passing by a stranger.

The human connection is free and probably holds the most value in our lives. It lets us know that we are human and part of a greater plan of life to coexist in peace and harmony.

As you think about it, perhaps those things that are of the greatest value are free.

Seems like a good way to do business too.

 

“Eat Less, Move More” Model; a Sure Way to Slow Your Metabolism and Gain Weight

Those selling weight loss believe the “eat less, move more” model. They falsely believe all calories are equal and stored in one single compartment.

Those that believe in this model think if you’re using more calories than you’re consuming you must be burning body fat and will lose weight.

The truth is there is more than a single compartment of calories. There are actually multiple compartments consisting of fat and glycogen. According to Jason Fung, MD, The Complete Guide to Fasting,

“To burn fat, two things must happen: you must burn through most of your stored glycogen, AND [emphasis added] insulin levels must drop low enough to release fat stores.”

Doing both of these two things isn’t easy. When stored glycogen gets low of glucose your