Creatine; How to Beat the Heat

I think everyone, from a stay at home mom, weekend warrior to elite athletes can benefit from supplementing with creatine. According to my friend and one of the world’s leading sports nutritionist, Michael Colgan, Ph.D., there have been no studies ever done regarding creatine that showed a negative effect. That means using creatine works!

This is why I use creatine in the heat of the Nevada desert while I’m training and even on recovery days to enhance my recovery.

From IsagenixHealth.net

Nowadays, up to 74 percent of athletes are reportedly using creatine because of its well-researched benefits on performance. However, some athletes have concerns about using the supplement in hot or humid environments, as creatine could have a negative effect on hydration. However, new research suggests that creatine could help with thermoregulation and actually support hydration status. Here’s why:

1. Creatine Attracts Water

As an osmotically active substance, creatine attracts water. Because creatine is stored primarily in muscle tissue, supplementation often increases the amount of water muscle

The No. 2 FREE Hack to Increase the Human Growth Hormone to Build Lean Muscle and Lose Fat

My blog titled,  The No. 1 FREE Hack to Increase the Human Growth Hormone for Better Health, you learned that Fasting is the best way to increase your HGH. It’s better than injections.

Today let’s go over the No. 2 best way to increase the HGH and when combined, you have a powerful activator of one of the best health hormones in your body.

From Bulletproof’s blog we learn;

Resistance training develops your brain, detoxes your body, and builds your physique

As the name suggests, resistance training puts your muscles up against a force that resists movement – think weightlifting, kettlebell training, and bodyweight workouts. Resistance training is typically brief and intense, driving your muscles to generate force from ATP stores instead of relying on oxygen.

Racing an Ironman without food

If you’d have asked me six months ago if it was humanly possible to race a 10 to 14 hour endurance race without fuel, specifically carbohydrates, only consuming water, I’d say it might be impossible.

Yet that is what I will do this November when I race the 140.6 mile Ironman Arizona. An Ironman consists of swimming 2.4 miles, followed by a 112 mile bike race and then the final leg running a 26.2 mile marathon. To be an official finisher I have to complete the total in 17 hours or less. The pros run in about 8 hours. My fastest time ever was 13:51 at this race in 2010.

I’ve discovered that I can actually race this long without the need to consume any carbohydrate while I race. At my pace intensity