Which half of America are you in? Diabetic or Not

I hope you’re not in the half with type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes.

With 52.4% of Americans with either full type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes, it’s wise to determine if your symptoms are related to diabetes.

Gaining weight around your midsection? High blood pressure?

Dieting doesn’t work anymore? Urinating often? Thirsty? Always hungry? (see list below)

Below I demonstrate a simple home A1C test to determine if you may be diabetic or pre-diabetic.

Jack Up Your Brain!; How to make your brain work in hyperdrive!

by

Emily Deans M.D.

The modern prescription of high carbohydrate, low-fat diets and eating snacks between meals has coincided with an increase in obesity, diabetes, and increase in the incidence of many mental health disorders, including depression, anxiety, and eating disorders. In addition, many of these disorders are striking the population at younger ages. While most people would agree that diet has a lot to do with the development of obesity and diabetes, many would disagree that what we eat has much to do with our mental health and outlook. I believe that what we eat has a lot to do with the health of our brains, though of course, mental illness (like physical illness) has multifactorial causes, and by no means should we diminish the importance of addressing all the causes in each individual. But let’s examine the opposite of the modern high carbohydrate, low fat, constant snacking lifestyle and how that might affect the brain.

The opposite of a low fat, snacking lifestyle would be the lifestyle our ancestors lived for tens of thousands of generations, the lifestyle for which our brains are primarily evolved. It seems reasonable that we would…..

Go to the article on the Psychology Today blog

 

HIIT; All the Pain, but is there more to gain?

HIGH- INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING

By Christian C. Evans

From Fall 2017 of USA Triathlon Magazine

ALL THE PAIN, BUT IS THERE MORE GAIN?

HIGH-INTENSITY INTERVAL TRAINING (HIIT) is a technique that has been used extensively to train athletes as well as for improving fitness and outcomes for people with medical conditions ranging from diabetes to heart disease. HIIT typically involves six to 10 short duration (10-60 seconds), super-high-intensity efforts (all-out or near 100 percent heart rate or VO2 Max) with a longer rest bout in between. Overall, HIIT is considered safe and effective, but is it better compared to moderate-intensity training for improving fitness and triathlon race performance?

As triathletes and consumers of triathlon products and media, we rely mainly on the word of manufacturers, athletes, and coaches to make decisions about the intensity and frequency of training. If there were no scientific literature available, then those sources would be appropriate. But over the past 30-40 years, there has been a lot of research on moderate intensity aerobic training and HIIT. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief overview of the scientific literature evaluating HIIT and advice about its use.

Fortunately, several systematic reviews (studies that objectively evaluate many individual studies and draw a conclusion on the overall effectiveness of a technique) have already been performed that have examined HIIT. Five recent reviews

Insulin; it affects everyone

A recent Facebook live presentation about insulin resistance .

Highlights:

  • Predicting the results of a diet before you even start
  • Role insulin plays
  • What is insulin resistance
  • Lower insulin with low carb diets and intermittent fasting

What happens when you eat?

Seems like an easy answer. “I put food in my mouth and don’t think about it.” Let’s explore the science after you “don’t think about it” anymore.

Most of the time when you eat you ingest more food energy than you can immediately use. The excess energy needs to be stored for later use. The key to “storage for later use” or “immediate use” is insulin (and you thought insulin was something diabetics worried about).

Insulin is released into the blood stream when you eat carbohydrates and protein and to a very small amount when you eat fat. Insulin is a pathway key that does one of two things and in this order, 1) it turns on the storage of the excess as fat and 2) it keeps the cell’s glucose (the sugar that is made primarily from carbohydrates) receptors open so the