DETOX by Cleansing & Fasting

I started to detox my body in 2006 by cleansing and fasting. I’ve been doing this for 12 years. It’s become a habit and I feel way better than at any time in my life.

In the short video, I go into some detail about how to both cleanse and fast. Below the video, I recommend a product and protocol.

 

Do you suffer from brain fog, tiredness or no pep in your life?

Did you know that environmental toxins find there way into your body from the food you eat (pesticides, antibiotics, and hormones), the water you drink and bathe

What’s the Best Income Earning Opportunity for Women Today?

Women have more options than ever before to earn income. While comparison pay with men still lags behind, our economy is forgiving and there are new innovating ways for women to earn more than men.

What profession has 5.3 million people (at the end of 2016) who are actively building income for themselves and 74% are women? The largest age segment in this innovated profession is between 35-44 (26%). The age segment that is catching up and the fastest growing is between 25-34.

DSA-facts

My Experience With This Profession

When I was in high school I really didn’t have a clue what I wanted to do. My dad was a plumber and his dad before him. My dad did teach me how to use my hands and I’m forever grateful for that. He said there were only three things I needed to know to become a plumber; “Poop rolls downhill, the boss is an SOB, and payday is Friday.”

It’s not INSULIN that makes you fat

What I Discovered that Three Professional Nutrition Coaches Didn’t Know

 

Video highlights

  • 3:07     Start
  • 5:22     The most important question to ask your self before you start a diet
  • 5:45     A simple understanding of the role of insulin
  • 7:18     What is insulin resistance?
  • 8:12     Excess glucose turns to fat
  • 8:47     How do you management insulin and fat burning
  • 9:08     Why “Eat less. Move more.” diets fail 93% of the time
  • 10:08    Why those on the Biggest Loser failed
  • 10:40    Your two storage compartments of calories
  • 12:15    Why the starvation and kill your self in the gym diets slow down your metabolism
  • 14:10    Why athletes bonk in races
  • 22:23    The most predictable diet

What I learned from the Ironman that changed my life

The Ironman triathlon consists of a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bike ride ending with a 26.2-mile marathon run. What went on from the very instant I decided to attempt it to finally finishing the race taught me more than I could have ever learned from a college degree of study.

“It was like anything that has ever been worthwhile in my life; it was hard, painful and memorable.” Michael Lantz

It was like anything that has ever been worthwhile in my life; it was hard, painful and memorable. I learned a great deal about the conflict of my body hurting and wanting to stop and my mind playing tricks on me, tempting me to quit.

If I had to sum up the top three things I learned about myself it would include these.

Commitment

I learned that my level of commitment is equal to the importance I place on my goals and dreams. When I decided to do my first Ironman on April 15, 2007, I was all in. I was not going to let anything get in the way of crossing that finish line. 

Your Brain on Exercise!

THE POWERFUL EFFECTS OF EXERCISE ON THE BRAIN

From ADDICTIONS to MENTAL ILLNESS, EXERCISE is increasingly recommended as part of a TREATMENT PLAN

By Pete Williams

(from USA Triathlon Fall 2017 Magazine)

The multisport lifestyle is full of success stories of people who overcame addictions and depression by adopting a busy training schedule of swimming, biking and running.

After all, it’s difficult to train for a triathlon with addictions getting in the way. Throw in the endorphin rush of training and the joy of competition that never grows old, and it’s not surprising that a number of athletes have beaten addiction, depression and even ADHD by replacing a bad habit with a healthy one such as triathlon training.

John Ratey, a clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, remembers when such positive body-mind connections were not widely recognized. During his residency in Boston at the height of the first running boom in the 1970s, Ratey worked with a marathon runner who had grown depressed when he stopped running and