The No. 1 FREE Hack to Increase the Human Growth Hormone for Better Health

The Human Growth Hormone (HGH) is a hormone that plays a huge role in the normal development of children and adolescents as the name implies. However, it also plays a role in adults.

obeseHGH deficiency in adults typically leads to

  • Higher levels of body fat,
  • Lower lean body mass, and
  • Decreased bone mass (osteopenia).

HGH only lasts a few minutes in the bloodstream.  It goes to the liver for metabolism, where it is converted into a number of other growth factors, the most important of which is Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 (IGF1).

Scientists first harvested HGH from cadavers in the 1950s, but only synthesized it in labs in the early 1980s.  Soon afterwards, it became a popular performance-enhancing drug. Normal levels of HGH peak in puberty (as you might expect) and gradually decrease thereafter.

Growth hormone is typically secreted during sleep and is one of the so-called counter-regulatory hormones.  HGH along with cortisol and adrenalin tell the body to increase the availability of glucose – so it counters the effect of insulin.

What happens when you eat?

Seems like an easy answer. “I put food in my mouth and don’t think about it.” Let’s explore the science after you “don’t think about it” anymore.

Most of the time when you eat you ingest more food energy than you can immediately use. The excess energy needs to be stored for later use. The key to “storage for later use” or “immediate use” is insulin (and you thought insulin was something diabetics worried about).

Insulin is released into the blood stream when you eat carbohydrates and protein and to a very small amount when you eat fat. Insulin is a pathway key that does one of two things and in this order, 1) it turns on the storage of the excess as fat and 2) it keeps the cell’s glucose (the sugar that is made primarily from carbohydrates) receptors open so the 

“Eat Less, Move More” Model; a Sure Way to Slow Your Metabolism and Gain Weight

Those selling weight loss believe the “eat less, move more” model. They falsely believe all calories are equal and stored in one single compartment.

Those that believe in this model think if you’re using more calories than you’re consuming you must be burning body fat and will lose weight.

The truth is there is more than a single compartment of calories. There are actually multiple compartments consisting of fat and glycogen. According to Jason Fung, MD, The Complete Guide to Fasting,

“To burn fat, two things must happen: you must burn through most of your stored glycogen, AND [emphasis added] insulin levels must drop low enough to release fat stores.”

Doing both of these two things isn’t easy. When stored glycogen gets low of glucose your

Racing an Ironman without food

If you’d have asked me six months ago if it was humanly possible to race a 10 to 14 hour endurance race without fuel, specifically carbohydrates, only consuming water, I’d say it might be impossible.

Yet that is what I will do this November when I race the 140.6 mile Ironman Arizona. An Ironman consists of swimming 2.4 miles, followed by a 112 mile bike race and then the final leg running a 26.2 mile marathon. To be an official finisher I have to complete the total in 17 hours or less. The pros run in about 8 hours. My fastest time ever was 13:51 at this race in 2010.

I’ve discovered that I can actually race this long without the need to consume any carbohydrate while I race. At my pace intensity

Carbohydrate Intolerance; Its Implications in Health and Fitness

Perhaps the most common cause of low quality of life, accelerated aging and chronic disease is the trio of increased body fat, chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. This white paper discusses the practical rationale for referring to the related dysfunctions associated with poor carbohydrate metabolism under the umbrella term Carbohydrate Intolerance.

By Dr. Philip Maffetone

Discussion

Introduction Many diseases begin to develop early in life. This happens long before most people, including healthcare professionals, would even consider the progressive nature of poor health in apparently young and healthy bodies.

Click to go to white paper

CI