Run Injury Free and Fast!

It is possible to run injury free! Yet the vast majority of runners have an inefficient run gait and are at a higher risk to sustain a run injuries including developing a sore lower back and possibly arthritis in the knee and hip, the three areas of the body that take the brunt of the force because of landing incorrectly and inefficiently.

I’ve had my share of running injuries because of:

Landing on my heel and sending a massive force and shock waves up to my knee and hip.

PUSHING  or LAUNCHING OFF the back leg to propel me forward. This becomes very tiring and it’s actually the cause of heel striking.

In the video, I’ll introduce you to a term: Run Pose. This is a position every runner obtains during their gait (see the many brief instructional videos on the Run Pose

Creatine; How to Beat the Heat

I think everyone, from a stay at home mom, weekend warrior to elite athletes can benefit from supplementing with creatine. According to my friend and one of the world’s leading sports nutritionist, Michael Colgan, Ph.D., there have been no studies ever done regarding creatine that showed a negative effect. That means using creatine works!

This is why I use creatine in the heat of the Nevada desert while I’m training and even on recovery days to enhance my recovery.

From IsagenixHealth.net

Nowadays, up to 74 percent of athletes are reportedly using creatine because of its well-researched benefits on performance. However, some athletes have concerns about using the supplement in hot or humid environments, as creatine could have a negative effect on hydration. However, new research suggests that creatine could help with thermoregulation and actually support hydration status. Here’s why:

1. Creatine Attracts Water

As an osmotically active substance, creatine attracts water. Because creatine is stored primarily in muscle tissue, supplementation often increases the amount of water muscle

Fat bombs & a beautiful desert ride!

In this week’s cool stuff

  • Swimming faster
  • Level of ketosis after training hard
  • My son’s coming home safe from Iraq
  • My happy place riding in the desert
  • Keep my knowledge level high
  • Awesome fat bombs!

 

Blood Lactate Testing for a Ketogenic Low-Carb Athlete; Is it Viable?

Blood lactate testing for speed athletes; sprinters to endurance, has been used successfully for at least the last 20 years.

However, there is not much written about it for an athlete on a ketogenic low-carb diet.

This article will attempt to answer some questions and lay a framework for a ketogenic low-carb athlete to consider using blood lactate to improve performance through proper training of the two main energy fuel systems. 

What I learned from the Ironman that changed my life

The Ironman triathlon consists of a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bike ride ending with a 26.2-mile marathon run. What went on from the very instant I decided to attempt it to finally finishing the race taught me more than I could have ever learned from a college degree of study.

“It was like anything that has ever been worthwhile in my life; it was hard, painful and memorable.” Michael Lantz

It was like anything that has ever been worthwhile in my life; it was hard, painful and memorable. I learned a great deal about the conflict of my body hurting and wanting to stop and my mind playing tricks on me, tempting me to quit.

If I had to sum up the top three things I learned about myself it would include these.

Commitment

I learned that my level of commitment is equal to the importance I place on my goals and dreams. When I decided to do my first Ironman on April 15, 2007, I was all in. I was not going to let anything get in the way of crossing that finish line.